Mounting Photos for Sale

Note - This blog entry was originally written for my Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for a limited edition run of the print that you see pictured. The campaign was, unfortunately, unsuccessful but I thought the information could be useful for others. Enjoy!


Hello Passersby!

I talked at the outset of the campaign about how I had some of the reward tiers already printed up, but they needed to be mounted and bagged before they would be ready to go. For this update, I thought I would show what goes in to that.

For this update, I used a 4x6 print on the 5x7 mat. The process is similar for the larger prints, but more of the tape may be needed.

What I used:

  • Self-adhesive linen hinging tape
  • Acid free mat board, cut to the appropriate size
  • Acid free backing board
  • Acid free plastic bag
  • White cotton gloves
  • Business card

Step 1:

Place the cut mat board so that its edge lines up with the the backing board.

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Step 2:

Cut a strip of the hinging tape the length that you need.

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Step 3:

Place the tape along where the mat board and the backing board touch. Push it down so that it lays flat and is securely attached to the boards.

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Step 4:

I like to wear white cotton gloves when mounting prints, as I do not have to worry about finger prints on the photograph that I’m handling.

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Sign the back of the picture if you want. I used an archival ink Micron pen for this. I did not always do this, but started to after doing some research on what other people were doing. It seemed like a good idea and doesn't hurt anything as long as you use the right ink.

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Place and position the photo so that you get the framing that you want.

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Step 5:

Cut two smaller strips of the linen tape. I try to get them so that they’re square, or at least squarish. Rectangles are just fine.

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Slip the tape, sticky side up, underneath the photo and press down so that the photograph and the tape are securely stuck together.

Step 6:

Cut another strip of tape, probably a little longer than a square. For this example, I cut the strip in half lengthwise as there really isn’t a whole lot of room as you can see with the mat size. For larger prints, use bigger strips.

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Place the strips sticky side down over the exposed strip of linen tape that is attached to the back of the photograph.

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Congrats! You just made a t-hinge.

Step 7:

For this size photo, I cut another square and placed it under the bottom of the photograph sticky side up. If it were a bigger, photo I would have repeated the process for the bottom that I did for the top.

This will help close this mat up!

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Step 8:

Close the mat. The photo should not move. If you followed what I did and had an exposed piece of tape at the bottom, press down on the mat.

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Sign the picture if you want. I used a pencil on the mat.

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Step 9:

Slide matted picture into bag.

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I always put a business card in with the picture, but that part is up to you.

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The bags I got have the adhesive already on the flap so it’s a simple matter of pressing and sealing.

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You have a matted picture!

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PRO TIPS:

  • If the photo is larger, it is a good idea to have something sitting on the picture after you’ve placed it but before you’ve taped it. Just make sure that you don’t put the weight directly on the photo. I usually have a clean microfiber cloth to act as a cushion for the weight.

  • This should work with many kinds of art, not just photos!

Posted in All Posts, Tutorials on Mar 02, 2018

Hey there!

Thanks for reading! I hope you found it fun, informative, interesting, or entertaining, Work like this is what I do full time so I’d appreciate any support you can give to help me continue! Or, if you’d rather, how about picking up a print from my store?

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Unless otherwise noted, all content Copyright © 2015-2018 Ronald A. Bigler.